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This article also relates to: Doberman Pinscher

The Dobermann originates from...

Recognising the demand for fearless and versatile watchdogs in 19th century Germany following the Franco-Prussian War, Herr Louis Dobermann began selective breeding dogs fit for purpose, although which breeds were originally used remains unknown. After 60 years of experimental canine interbreeding, Herr Louis Dobermann achieved success and the Dobermann, or 'Devil Dog,' as it was commonly known by the American Marines during WWII, came into popularity. Sent onshore to effectively flush out the enemy, the Dobermann established a reputation as an aggressive, unpredictable breed, primarily used for guarding and policing. The modern Dobermann, however, boasts far gentler traits and is subsequently a highly sought domestic dog.

The Dobermann is characterised by...

Originally bred as guard dogs, the Dobermann has an athletic, lean build and is of medium size. Characteristic traits include a long tail, however, in numerous countries where 'docking' is legalised, the tail may have been significantly reduced. Similarly, it is common practice in some countries to crop the natural ears of canines bred for guard duty, as a functionality measure. The neck, head and legs are proportionate to the body and the breed is commonly recognised in colours of black, brown, fawn, or black and tan.

The average Dobermann...

Whilst the temperament of the Dobermann is up for conjecture, bearing in mind the breed was selectively created for the purposes of guarding and protecting, the modern Dobermann is noted for its loyal and affectionate temperament, being gentle with children and active in play. The Dobermann is both vigilant and intelligent, and is able to perceive potential threat, acting fearlessly to protect its family when necessary. The average Dobermann will weigh between 30-40 kg, depending on its gender, and has a life expectancy of 12-14 years, when shown appropriate care.

Because no breed is without its weakness...

Whilst the Dobermann is a resilient breed in many respects, various studies have shown that the Dobermann is particularly susceptible to prostatic diseases, including bacterial infections and prostatic cysts; it is possible to avoid such complaints by neutering your dog. Besides this, more serious common health complaints include von Willebrand's disease - a bleeding disorder, cervical vertabral instability (CVI), heart complaints and dilated cardiomyopathy. There is evidence to suggest that the causes of these diseases stem from inherited, familial disease prevalent in the breed.

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Our Dobermann owners' thoughts

13th Oct 2013
Pat Holden
  • VioVet Customer Since: September 2009
  • From: lancs, United Kingdom

Luca is so loving and gentle, but also very protective of his family, if I am alone at home I know I am safe, he stays by my side all the time, yet he is kind with other people once he has checked them out and knows they are no threat to me or any of the family. he is just adorable.

24th Mar 2014
Louise Capper
  • VioVet Customer Since: August 2012
  • From: Western Australia, Australia

If you want a dog to put out in your backyard, then a dobermann is not for you! They are most suited to people and families that will include them in their day to day lives. There is nothing so true as the phrase "Having a dobermann is never going to the toilet again alone." They will typically want to be involved in everything you do.

This will always be the breed for me. Truly a companion dog.

20th Apr 2016
Lisa Smith
  • VioVet Customer Since: September 2015
  • From: Kent, United Kingdom

Luca is my third Dobermann, i had always loved the breed and finally i had my first girl Molly, followed by Phoebe and now Luca. I don't think i could ever have another breed. They are known as Velcro dogs and they will follow you everywhere, they must be close to you at all times. They need a lot of time and interaction. Their energy levels are high they need exercise and mental stimulation, and are very, very demanding puppies. I would say if you are prepared to learn about the breed, and all the potential health risks, of which they are susceptible to many sadly, and are prepared to literally share your life with your Dobe, then they will reward you with total love and loyalty. I love them totally and could'nt imagine life without them.

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