Having a kitten is a fun and rewarding experience. But it does come with a lot of responsibility and decision-making. What will you feed them? Will they be allowed out when they’re old enough, or be an indoor-only cat? Will you get them neutered/spayed?

The question of getting your cat ‘fixed’ is a big one and one that can’t be addressed fully in this article, so it would be best to speak to your vet before deciding.

By choosing to neuter your cat, you’re helping to reduce the overpopulation problem and the number of cats that end up in rescues but, sometimes there are medical or behavioural issues that may mean it isn’t the right choice for your cat.

Below is our summary of the pros and cons of neutering and spaying to help you make an informed decision:

Pros for neutering your male cat

  • It helps reduce the overpopulation problem as your cat will no longer be able to breed.
  • It removes your cat’s drive to mate and stray from home, which may produce a calmer demeanour and reduce vocalisation.
  • It reduces territorial behaviours like urine marking.
  • It removes the risk of testicular cancer.

Cons of neutering your male cat

  • It involves anaesthetic and surgery, along with the risk of complications.
  • It may increase the risk of diabetes and urinary incontinence.
  • It could lead to weight gain.

Pros of spaying your female cat

  • It helps reduce the overpopulation problem as your cat will no longer be able to breed.
  • It removes heat cycles, which can be uncomfortable.
  • Your kitten will be much less likely to develop cancers, including mammary gland and uterine tumours.
  • It removes your cat’s drive to mate and stray from home, which may produce a calmer demeanour and reduce vocalisation.
  • It will stabilise hormone levels, meaning your cat is less likely to develop UTIs.

Cons of spaying your female cat

  • It involves anaesthetic and surgery, along with the risk of complications.
  • It may increase the risk of diabetes and urinary incontinence.
  • It could lead to weight gain.

Hopefully these points have helped in your decision-making but, if not, your vet is the best person to speak to about your concerns. Feel free to comment below with your own experiences and any points you think we have missed.

Written by: Hannah