Open Fri 8:30am : 01582 842096
VioVet Insurance

Hills Prescription Diet l/d Cat Food

  • Dry » 1.5kg Bag £16.40

Description

Hills L/D available from VioVet

The liver is the largest internal organ in the body and it carries out a bewildering array of vital metabolic tasks. Many of the functions of the liver are influenced by diet. Some constituents of the diet can cause the liver to have to perform additional work in order to maintain a healthy internal environment. Other ingredients if provided in increased levels can actually help support liver function. Hills prescription diet feline l/d is for the nutritional management of cats with liver disorders. Liver disorders are often serious conditions frequently accompanied by many uncomfortable and even painful symptoms for your cat. Hills prescription diet l/d was created specifically for the nutritional management cats with liver disorders that cause reduced liver function. Because the liver works to rid the body of toxins, it can be subjected to damage and reduced function from infections and ingested poisons as well as altered blood flow.

Hills L/D prescription Diet Disclaimer - VioVet

100% Satisfaction Guaranteed or your money back on all Hills pet food!

Feeding Guide

Adult Cats

These ranges are a starting point only, because cats' needs vary.Adjust the feeding amount to maintain optimal body weight.

Short Term Feeding of Kittens

Based on a kitten's age and weight,

  • feed the same number of 156g cans of l/d Feline, as is shown for Science Plan Kitten Heathy Development in the Daily Feeding Amounts for kittens in the Science Plan section plus an additional 10%
  • Feed the same number of grams of l/d Feline dry as is shown for Science Plan Kitten Healthy Development in the Daily Feeding Amounts for kittens in the Science Plan section plus an additional 15%
Body Weight kg Dry grams
2 30 - 40
3 40 - 55
4 50 - 70
5 60 - 80
6 65 - 90
7 + 11 - 13 per kg

A 156g can is equal to 40 grams of the dry food.

Body Weight kg Cans 156g
2 2/3 - 1
3 1 - 1 1/3
4 1 1/4 - 1 2/3
5 1 1/3 - 2
6 1 2/3 - 2 1/4
7 + 1/4 per kg

Kibble image

Hills Prescription Diet l/d key benefits

Key Features Key Benefits

Protein

Branched-chain amino acids
Aromatic amino acids
Highly digestible & reduced
High

Balanced
Reduces workload on liver.

Helps reduce accumulation of ammonia and consequent CNS signs (hepatic encephalopathy).
Zink
Vitamin K
Increased Helps reduce the risk of deficiencies common in liver disorders.
Copper controlled Helps reduce copper accumulation in the liver.
L-Carnitine Supplemented Helps improve fat metabolism to limit hepatic lipidosis.
Soluble fibre Supplemented Helps decreases ammonia reabsorption (and ammonia generation) in the bowel.
Sodium Reduced Helps limits portal hypertension and ascites.
Helps control clinical signs associated with sodium and fluid retention.
Potassium Increased Helps avoids hypokalaemia which can trigger CNS signs.
Arginine Increased Helps maintain urea cycle, avoiding accumulation of ammonia.
Taurine High Helps maintain normal heart muscle function.
Superior antioxidant formula Added Neutralises free radicals associated with liver disorders.

Ingredients

Dry

Ground maize, chicken and turkey meal, animal fat, maize gluten meal, dried whole egg, ground rice, flaxseed, dried beet pulp, digest, potassium chloride, L-carninte supplement, cellulose, calcium carbonate, taurine, L-arginine, DL-methionine, vitamins and trace elements. Contains EU approved antioxidant.

Can

Pork liver, maize gluten meal, rice flour, pasta, vegetable oil, soybean meal, animal fat, dried whole egg, soy fibre, digest, fish oil, dicalcium phosphate, cellulose, potassium chloride, L-lysine hydrochloride, calcium sulphate, L-arginine, taurine, iodised salt, calcium carbonate, DL-methionine, L-carnitine supplement, vitamins and trace elements.

Analysis

Dry

Average Nutritional Contents

As Fed Dry Matter kcal/100g
Beta-carotene 1.5 mg/kg 1.6 mg/kg 0.04 mg
Calcium 0.84 % 0.91 % 206 mg
Carbohydrate (NFE) 34.2 % 37 % 8.4 g
Copper 6.18 mg/kg 6.68 mg/kg 0.15 mg
Fat 21.7 % 23.5 % 5.3 g
Fibre (crude) 1.7 % 1.8 % 0.4 g
L-Carnitine 925 mg/kg 1000 mg/kg 23 mg
Magnesium 0.07 % 0.08 % 18 mg
Moisture 7.5 % - 1.8 g
Omega-3 fatty acids 0.73 % 0.79 % 180 mg
Omega-6 fatty acids 3.68 % 3.98 % 903 mg
Phosphorus 0.63 % 0.69 % 155 mg
Potassium 0.84 % 0.9 % 205 mg
Protein 29.6 % 32 % 7.2 g
Sodium 0.23 % 0.25 % 56 mg
Taurine 0.46 % 0.5 % 113 mg
Vitamin A 33750 IU/kg 36486 IU/kg 827 IU
Vitamin C 70 mg/kg 76 mg/kg 1.7 mg
Vitamin D 580 IU/kg 627 IU/kg 14 IU
Vitamin E 550 mg/kg 595 mg/kg 13 mg
Zinc 290 mg/kg 313 mg/kg 7 mg

Metabolisable Energy

As Fed Dry Matter
kcal/100g 408 441
kJ/100g 1707 1846
Protein calories 25 %
Fat calories 45 %
Target urinary pH 6.4 - 6.6

Can

Average Nutritional Contents

As Fed Dry Matter kcal/100g
Beta-carotene 0.38 mg/kg 1.5 mg/kg 0.03 mg
Calcium 0.22 % 0.86 % 196 mg
Carbohydrate (NFE) 9.4 % 37.6 % 8.5 g
Copper 3.57 mg/kg 14.29 mg/kg 0.32 mg
Fat 5.8 % 23.3 % 5.3 g
Fibre (crude) 0.4 % 1.7 % 0.4 g
L-Carnitine 250 mg/kg 1001 mg/kg 23 mg
Magnesium 0.016 % 0.07 % 15 mg
Moisture 75 % - 68.1 g
Omega-3 fatty acids 0.42 % 1.67 % 379 mg
Omega-6 fatty acids 2.07 % 8.3 % 1884 mg
Phosphorus 0.17 % 0.66 % 151 mg
Potassium 0.23 % 0.9 % 204 mg
Protein 7.9 % 31.7 % 7.2 g
Sodium 0.05 % 0.2 % 45 mg
Taurine 0.13 % 0.51 % 117 mg
Vitamin A 15700 IU/kg 62840 IU/kg 1426 IU
Vitamin C 17 mg/kg 68 mg/kg 1.5 mg
Vitamin D 310 IU/kg 1241 IU/kg 28 IU
Vitamin E 150 mg/kg 600 mg/kg 14 mg
Zinc 84 mg/kg 335 mg/kg 8 mg

Metabolisable Energy

As Fed Dry Matter
kcal/100g 110 441
kJ/100g 461 1844
kcal/can 172
Protein calories 25 %
Fat calories 45 %
Target urinary pH 6.4 - 6.6

Other products to consider

For hepatic lipidosis without encephalopathy or primary liver disease: Prescription Diet™ a/d™ Canine/Feline.

Recommended for

  • Liver disorders.
  • Hepatic encephalopathy
  • Hepatic lipidosis (with encephalopathy or primary liver disease).
  • Cardiac disorders early stage.

Not recommended for

  • Long term feeding of kittens
  • Pregnant or lactating queens
  • Cats with hyperlipidaemia

Need help or advice? Contact us:

  • Landline: 01582 842096
  • Freephone*: 0800 084 2608
  • Mon - Fri: 8:30am - 6:00pm
  • Sat: 9:00am - 1:00pm
  • Email: support@viovet.co.uk

All prices include VAT where applicable. *The freephone number is free from most UK landlines only, mobiles are usually charged so we'd recommend calling our landline from your mobile or internationally.

Reviews of Hills Prescription Diet l/d Cat Food

Read our customers' reviews of Hills Prescription Diet l/d Cat Food

Questions & Answers for Hills Prescription Diet l/d Cat Food

Below are some recent questions we've received regarding Hills Prescription Diet l/d Cat Food, including answers from our team.

Ask Your Own Question

6 week old kitten with possible liver shunt

4th Jun 2016
Hope - Liver shunt kitty
  • VioVet Customer Since: May 2016
  • From: Somerset, United Kingdom

Would this be safe for a 6 week old kitten with possible liver shunt to eat? She can't have lactulose meds as too young and dehydration risk at the moment. Still bottle feeding and won't eat yoghurt/ cottage cheese etc. Doesn't like royal canin hepatic biscuits mushed up. At a loss what to give her apart from babycat milk and baby rice.

John Cousins
  • Veterinary Surgeon

Hills LD would be a reasonable choice of food to include in her diet at this stage, though ultimately you will probably need to get a full and accurate diagnosis before you can be sure of the best treatment and management options. It might not be as palatable as some of the more standard diets, but if she has a liver shunt this diet should be better for her. You might have to mash it up with a little warm water to help her to take to it.

I have to change to an l/d diet and cat only eats a little

4th Jul 2015
L/d diet

I have to change my cat to an L/D diet. I bought the wet food as the vet suggested keeping her on wet food for a while after having several teeth removed. She ate less than half a can, how can I persuade her to change to this new food

John Cousins
  • Veterinary Surgeon

Cats know what they want and can be amazingly fussy sometimes. At least she ate a little of the new diet.As long as she is eating something, she will keep herself going. (To stop eating completely is not healthy for a cat, especially an overweight cat.) Cats tend to get used to foods in time and she will probably start to eat it better in future. I would persist with the new diet and not try to change it or add other things personally.