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Company Of Animals Pet Corrector

  • 30ml Can £3.97
  • 50ml Can £6.09
  • 200ml Can £10.84
  • Holster (Fits 50ml Can) £3.54

Selection of 4 products from

£3.54 to £10.84

Description

Snakes, insects and birds such as geese, use their hiss sound to drive off predators, and our domesticated pets have an instinctive sensitivity to this sound. The Pet Corrector emits a hiss of compressed gas which mimics this sound to interrupt undesirable behaviours such as jumping up, stealing, chasing and barking. The inert gas is safe, has no smell and works on most animals including dogs, cats and horses. There is a detailed training guide included, with helpful training tips and key dos and don'ts.

The Pet Corrector Holster holds one 50ml can and can be attached to a pocket or belt to always give you quick access to the spray.

Usage tips

  • Test the animal's sensitivity: operate at over 1 metre distance
  • Direct the spray away from your pet's face, not towards it
  • Only use the Pet Corrector to interrupt a serious misdemeanor, it is not a substitute for poor training
  • Make the shortest possible bursts as the canister will chill with prolonged use.

Need help or advice? Contact us:

  • Landline: 01582 842096
  • Freephone*: 0800 084 2608
  • Mon - Fri: 8:30am - 6:00pm
  • Sat: 9:00am - 1:00pm
  • Email: support@viovet.co.uk

All prices include VAT where applicable. *The freephone number is free from most UK landlines only, mobiles are usually charged so we'd recommend calling our landline from your mobile or internationally.

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Fighting

26th Sep 2014
louise

Is this product any good to stop dogs fighting

John Cousins
  • Veterinary Surgeon

It might be a help a bit, but is very unlikely to be a complete answer. Castration and/or other management strategies will probably be needed.