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Barking Heads Fat Dog Slim Dog Food

  • Dry » 2kg Bag £10.79
  • Dry » 6kg Bag £24.74
  • Dry » 12kg Bag £44.99
  • Professional Dry » 18kg Bag £63.89
  • Wet » 6 x 400g Tins £9.67
  • Wet » 8 x 400g Trays £12.89

Selection of 6 products from

£9.67 to £63.89


Barking Heads "Fat Dog Slim" is a tailored and balanced feed, formulated to support weight maintenance in dogs that are either overweight or prone to weight gain. The specially blended formula doesn't compromise on nutritional value, quality, texture or taste and contains wholesome and natural ingredients, whilst being low in fat with reduced calorie content. The diet contains protein-rich portions of British chicken and brown rice, which aid in the digestive process and help promote lean body tone. This means your dog can remain healthy and active whilst achieving a more ideal weight and body shape. Nutritious and delicious to suit even the fussiest appetites!

Now available is Fat Dog Slim wet food which is a deliciously tasty adult light diet made with freshly prepared lean British chicken, brown rice, vegetables & herbs. This gently steamed meal is a tasty choice for those that need to lose a pound or two. There are no artificial colourings, flavourings or preservatives and no GM ingredients in this food.

Feeding Guidelines

Barking Heads "Fat Dog Slim" is a carefully balanced diet for dogs that are prone to weight gain. The diet contains low carbohydrates and plentiful vitamins and minerals to ensure internal health. To fool dogs into thinking they are consuming more, the kibble even has a hole in the middle! For more information, please contact us.

The following table is a guide to feeding Barking Heads Fat Dog Slim. All dogs are unique and other factors such as age, activity levels, growth spurts can have an effect on their nutritional needs. Please check with your vet that you dog is at their correct healthy weight. Although your dog may want to devour the whole bag we recommend that your introduce any new food gradually, replacing 25% of their existing food every day until they are eating 100% Barking Heads.

Always ensure there is a fresh bowl of water available at all times.

Daily Suggested feeding amounts for Barking Heads Fat Dog Slim.


Managed Weight Loss
(Target Weight in kg)
Weight of dog (kg) Amount per day (grams) Weight of dog (kg) Amount per day (grams)
5 - 10 75 - 145 5 - 10 115 - 190
10 - 20 145 - 255 10 - 20 190 - 325
20 - 30 255 - 355 20 - 30 325 - 440
30 - 40 355 - 445 30 - 40 440 - 545
40+ 445 40+ 545


Weight of dog

Fed on its own Fed as a topper with dry food

up to 5kg

1 tray

as desired up to ¼ tray


2 trays

as desired up to ½ tray


3 trays

as desired up to 1 trays


4 trays

as desired up to 1 ½ trays

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Ingredients List

Brown Rice, Dried Chicken (18%), Potato, Oats, Barley, Lucerne, Trout (5%), Peas, Boneless Fresh Chicken (4.5%), Sunflower Oil, Natural Flavours, Seaweed, Tomato, Dried Carrot, Chicken Stock (2.5%), Glucosamine (350mg/kg), MSM (350mg/kg), Chondroitin (240mg/kg)

Ingredient Analysis

Crude Protein (20%), Fat Content (9%), Inorganic Matter (8%), Crude Fibre (5%), Moisture (8%), Omega-6 (2.6%), Omega-3 (0.7%), Ferrous Sulphate Monohydrate (617mg), Zinc Sulphate Monohydrate (514mg), Manganous Sulphate Monohydrate (101mg), Cupric Sulphate Pentahydrate (37mg), Calcium Iodate Anhydrous (4.55mg), Sodium Selenite (0.51mg), L'Carnitine (200mg), Vitamin A (16,650Iu), Vitamin D3 (1,480Iu), Vitamin E (460Iu)

Dry weight nutrients

Protein 21.7%
Fat 9.8%
Carbs 53.3%
Fibre 5.4%
Ash 9.8%

Ingredients List

Chicken (50%), Chicken broth (20%), Brown Rice (10%), Carrots, Peas, Potato, Minerals, Sunflower Oil, Salmon Oil, Tomato, Kelp, Basil, Glucosamine HCI, Chondroitin

Ingredient Analysis

Protein (10%), Fat Content (4%), Inorganic Matter (3%), Crude Fibre (0.3%), Moisture (75%), L-Carnitine (25mg/kg), Vitamin A (3,000Iu), Vitamin D3 (420Iu), Vitamin E (40mg), Vitamin B Complex (26mg), Zinc Sulphate Monohydrate (107mg/kg), Manganese Sulphate (12mg/kg), Sodium Selenite (0.9mg/kg), Calcium Iodate (0.6mg/kg)

Colour Key

  • High quality and healthy
  • Lots of beneficial nutrients
  • Some benefits
  • Nutritionally adequate
  • Not likely to cause any problems
  • Vague description
  • Little to no nutritional benefit
  • Potentially controversial

Reviews of Barking Heads Fat Dog Slim Dog Food

Read our customers' reviews of Barking Heads Fat Dog Slim Dog Food

Questions & Answers for Barking Heads Fat Dog Slim Dog Food

Below are some recent questions we've received regarding Barking Heads Fat Dog Slim Dog Food, including answers from our team.

Ask Your Own Question

Wet low fat food

28th Dec 2014

My dog as had pancreatitis, and is currently on expensive gastro intestine low fat, is your low a suitable replacement or potential to mix

John Cousins
  • Veterinary Surgeon

Any low fat diet should be suitable for dogs prone to pancreatitis, but none will guarantee that the condition will never recur. Generally it is probably best to establish a regular feeding routine and stick to it, with any change being gradual and avoiding large amounts of treats. This Barking Heads diet is a very good one, so it should be fine for your dog, but if you go for it you will have to mich the two for at least a week, gradually shifting the proportions.

Response to question on dieting dog!

29th Oct 2014
Carole Gray

Hi there John

Thanks for responding so quickly. Harvey was diagnosed with laryngeal paralysis back in August and currently doesn't need treatment other than to lose some weight which he's been doing successfully. He has lost 3.5kg since the summer and is just under 40kg currently - we would however like to get him lower than this obviously. He's had lots of blood tests and was found to have a low thyroid level but not low enough to be treated. Anyway I don't know where his fussiness comes from - he is now being fed from a slow feeder (bought from VioVet!) so it could just be that he's bored with not being able to wolf back food like normal! He constantly leaves his food but will eventually eat it hence my original question of whether he liked it! I will persevere for now as somewhere along the line it must be working as he has lost weight but obviously could do with loosing more!

John Cousins
  • Veterinary Surgeon

I think you need to give less food.

Do not do this, but try to think what would happen if you gave him just one teaspoonful of food per day. After a few days, how long do you think that teaspoonful of food would last in his bowl. My guess is milliseconds. As much water as he wanted but no food other than this one teaspoonful every day. He would be a different dog. This really is not rocket science. I think from what you say the main reason he is not eating it keenly is he is not hungry enough. 40kg is still sounds much too heavy. He needs to lose weight and you would like to see him eating his food more keenly. Reduce the amount he gets every day and I can promise that you will achieve both. Honestly it is that simple. Try not to confuse generosity with appropriate care. When it comes to food, mean is often healthier and hence happier. I would probably reduce the daily ration by a third, then reassess after a week or two. It might need to go lower than that eventually.

Suitable for Seniors?

29th Oct 2014
Carole Gray

Hi there, Harvey my nearly 10 year old Golden Retriever is constantly on a diet! We manage his weight with food and exercise obviously and he goes to hydrotherapy fortnightly too. He is currently on Burns Senior Light food but is rapidly going off it! Is this food suitable for the senior dog - I notice it contains glucosamine so I imagine that it must be. Thanks very much.

John Cousins
  • Veterinary Surgeon

This Barking Heads diet is probably very suitable for your dog. However I am a bit surprised by what you say, so please forgive me for mentioning the following: When you say your dog is constantly on a diet, I presume you mean that you have to try and control his weight. Usually this means restricting the amount of food given so that he cannot eat too much. This should mean that you are giving less than he wants to eat, so that he is always hungry. If his weight is being controlled by restricted food, he should be so hungry that he will eat any food and not go off the food given. Fussiness normally only comes in when dogs are given a choice and when they are given all the food they want to eat. Therefore something is not making sense. If your dog is bright and well but not as slim as he should be and not actually losing weight at the moment, you need to be less generous and let him get more hungry. Giving him all he wants to eat will not result in any weight loss, whatever food you give. If he is not bright and well and not eating well, he needs to see a vet for a check up. I suspect you are too generous with the food and need to feed less. Cruel to be kind is the usual saying. If in doubt, talk to your vet. However the right amount of food to feed a dog is the amount which produces the correct bodyweight. If a basically healthy dog is overweight, he is eating too much food. The type of food can make a difference, but the amount is the main thing.

Dog need low fat diet

17th Jun 2014

my dog has to loose wight as she has a problem with her liver and gall bladder is enlarged. she will need her gall bladder taken out if it get's any larger. Do you think this will help.

Many thanks


John Cousins
  • Veterinary Surgeon

I expect this food will be suitable for your dog, but you might need to restrict the amount you give as well. This is something I would suggest that your own vet is best able to advise on. If your dog is also overweight, which seems likely, then an appropriate diet is only half of the answer. Feeding only the amount which results in the correct bodyweight is very important with pretty much any condition.