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Advocate Spot-on Solution for Dogs & Cats

Advocate Spot-on Solution for Dogs & Cats

Advocate is a spot-on treatment used to control internal and external parasites affecting dogs, cats and ferrets. The contents of one pipette are applied to the skin on the back of the neck between the parted hair. The area is then left to dry, which might take a few hours. One of the active ingredients, moxidectin, is absorbed through the skin and travels around the body, treating internal parasites such as worms. The other active ingredient, imidacloprid, transfers across the surface of the body, dissolved in the oils on the surface of the skin and hairs. Surface living parasites such as fleas are killed on contact.

Of all the products available, Advocate probably kills the broadest range of parasites affecting dogs, cats and ferrets

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Description

Presentation

Advocate spot-on solution for cats and ferrets is a clear yellow to brownish solution containing 100 mg/ml imidacloprid and 10 mg/ml moxidectin with benzyl alcohol and Butylhydroxytoluene 1 mg/ml (E 321 as an antioxidant). Each pipette of the small cat and ferret presentations contains 0.4 ml (40 mg imidacloprid, 4 mg moxidectin), the large cat presentation contains 0.8 ml (80 mg imidacloprid, 8 mg moxidectin).

Advocate spot-on solution for dogs is a clear yellow to brownish solution containing 100 mg/ml imidacloprid and 25 mg/ml moxidectin with benzyl alcohol and Butylhydroxytoluene 1 mg/ml (E321 as an antioxidant). Each pipette of the dog presentations contains either 0.4 ml (40 mg imidacloprid, 10 mg moxidectin), 1.0 ml (100 mg imidacloprid, 25 mg moxidectin), 2.5 ml (250 mg imidacloprid, 62.5 mg moxidectin) or 4.0 ml (400 mg imidacloprid, 100 mg moxidectin).

Uses

For use in cats, ferrets and dogs suffering from, or at risk from, mixed parasitic infections:

For cats: For the treatment and prevention of flea infestation (Ctenocephalides felis), treatment of ear mite infestation (Otodectes cynotis), prevention of heartworm disease (L3 and L4 larvae of Dirofilaria immitis) and treatment of infections with gastrointestinal nematodes (L4 larvae, immature adults and adults of Toxocara cati and Ancylostoma tubaeforme). The product can be used as part of a treatment strategy for flea allergy dermatitis (FAD).

For ferrets: For the treatment and prevention of flea infestation (Ctenocephalides felis) and the prevention of heartworm disease (L3 and L4 larvae of Dirofilaria immitis).

For dogs: For the treatment and prevention of flea infestation (Ctenocephalides felis), treatment of biting lice (Trichodectes canis), treatment of ear mite infestation (Otodectes cynotis), sarcoptic mange (caused by Sarcoptes scabiei var. canis), demodicosis (caused by Demodex canis), prevention of heartworm disease (L3 and L4 larvae of Dirofilaria immitis) and angiostrongylosis (L4 larvae and immature adults of Angiostrongylus vasorum), treatment of Angiostrongylus vasorum and Crenosoma vulpis and treatment of infections with gastrointestinal nematodes (L4 larvae, immature adults and adults of Toxocara canis, Ancylostoma caninum and Uncinaria stenocephala, adults of Toxascaris leonina and Trichuris vulpis). The product can be used as part of a treatment strategy for flea allergy dermatitis (FAD).

Dosage and administration

Dosage schedule

The recommended minimum doses for cats are 10 mg/kg body weight imidacloprid and 1.0 mg/kg body weight moxidectin, equivalent to 0.1ml/kg body weight Advocate for cats. Dosage schedule for ferrets: one pipette of Advocate spot-on solution for small cats and ferrets (0.4 ml) should be administered per animal. Do not exceed the recommended dose. The recommended minimum doses for dogs are 10 mg/kg body weight imidacloprid and 2.5 mg/kg body weight moxidectin, equivalent to 0.1ml/kg body weight Advocate for dogs.

The treatment schedule for all species should be based on the local epidemiological situation.

Cats (Refer to Table 1)

Table 1:

Weight of CAT [kg]

Pipette size to be used

Volume (ml)

Imidacloprid [mg/kg bw]

Moxidectin [mg/kg bw]

≤4kg

Advocate for small cats and ferrets

0.4

minimum of 10

minimum of 1

>4-8kg

Advocate for large cats

0.8

10-20

1-2

>8kg

the appropriate combination of pipettes

Dogs(Refer to Table 2)

Table 2:

Weight of DOG [kg]

Pipette size to be used

Volume (ml)

Imidacloprid [mg/kg bw]

Moxidectin [mg/kg bw]

≤4kg

Advocate for small dogs

0.4

minimum of 10

minimum of 2.5

>4-10kg

Advocate for medium dogs

1.0

10-25

2.5-6.25

>10-25kg

Advocate for large dogs

2.5

10-25

2.5-6.25

>25-40kg

Advocate for extra-large dogs

4.0

10-16

2.5-4

>40kg

the appropriate combination of pipettes

Flea treatment and prevention (Cats and Dogs)

One treatment prevents future flea infestation for 4 weeks. Existing pupae in the environment may emerge for 6 weeks or longer after treatment is initiated, depending upon climatic conditions. Therefore, it may be necessary to combine Advocate treatment with environmental treatments aimed at breaking the flea life cycle in the surroundings. This can result in a more rapid reduction in the household flea population. The product should be administered at monthly intervals when used as part of a treatment strategy for flea allergy dermatitis.

Flea treatment and prevention (Ferrets)

One treatment prevents future flea infestation for 3 weeks. Under heavy flea pressure it may be necessary to repeat the dose after 2 weeks.

Treatment of ear mite infestation (Otodectes cynotis) (Cats & Dogs)

A single dose of the product should be administered. In dogs, loose debris should be gently removed from the external ear canal at each treatment. For both cats and dogs, a further veterinary examination 30 days after treatment is recommended as some animals may require a second treatment. Do not apply directly to the ear canal.

Treatment of biting lice (Trichodectes canis) (Dogs)

A single dose should be administered. A further veterinary examination 30 days after treatment is recommended as some animals may require a second treatment.

Treatment of sarcoptic mange (caused by Sarcoptes scabiei var. canis) (Dogs)

A single dose should be administered twice 4 weeks apart.

Treatment of demodicosis (caused by Demodex canis) (Dogs)

The administration of a single dose every 4 weeks for 2 to 4 months is efficacious against Demodex canis and leads to a marked improvement of clinical signs particularly in mild to moderate cases. Especially severe cases may require more prolonged and more frequent treatment. To achieve the best possible response in these severe cases, at the discretion of the veterinarian, Advocate can be applied once a week and for a prolonged time. In all cases it is essential that the treatment should be continued until skin scrapings are negative on at least 2 consecutive monthly occasions. Treatment should be stopped in dogs that show no improvement or do not respond in mite count after 2 months treatment. Alternative treatment should be administered. Seek the advice of your veterinarian.

As demodicosis is a multi-factorial disease, where possible, it is advisable to also treat any underlying disease appropriately.

Heartworm prevention (Cats, Ferrets & Dogs)

Cats, ferrets and dogs in areas endemic for heartworm, or those which have travelled to endemic areas, may be infected with adult heartworms. Therefore prior to treatment with Advocate, the advice provided in Contra-Indications and Warnings etc should be considered. For prevention of heartworm disease, the product must be applied at regular monthly intervals during the time of the year when mosquitoes (the intermediate hosts which carry and transmit heartworm larvae) are present. The product may be administered throughout the year or at least 1 month before the first expected exposure to mosquitoes. Treatment should continue at regular monthly intervals until 1 month after the last exposure to mosquitoes. To establish a treatment routine, it is recommended that the same day or date be used each month. When replacing another heartworm preventative product in a heartworm prevention programme, the first treatment with Advocate must be given within 1 month of the last dose of the former medication. In non-endemic areas there should be no risk of animals having heartworm. Therefore they can be treated without special precautions.

Roundworm and hookworm treatment (Cats)

In areas endemic for heartworm, monthly treatment may significantly reduce the risk of re-infection caused by the respective roundworms and hookworms. In areas non-endemic for heartworm, the product can be used as part of a seasonal prevention programme against fleas and gastrointestinal nematodes.

Roundworm, hookworm and whipworm treatment (Dogs)

In areas endemic for heartworm, monthly treatment may significantly reduce the risk of re-infection caused by the respective round-, hook- and whipworms. In areas non-endemic for heartworm, the product can be used as part of a seasonal prevention programme against fleas and gastrointestinal nematodes. Studies have shown that monthly treatment of dogs will prevent infections caused by Uncinaria stenocephala.

Treatment and Prevention of Angiostrongylus vasorum (Dogs)

A single dose should be administered. A further veterinary examination 30 days after treatment is recommended as some animals may require a second treatment.

In endemic areas regular four weekly application will prevent angiostrongylosis and patent infection with Angiostrongylus vasorum.

Treatment of Crenosoma vulpis (Dogs)

A single dose should be administered

Method of administration

For external use only.

Remove one pipette from the package. Then hold the pipette in an upright position, and twist and pull off the cap. Reverse the cap and use it to twist and remove the seal from the pipette, as shown. See Figure 1.

Advocate1

Figure 1: Opening a pipette

Cats and Ferrets

Part the fur on the animal's neck at the base of the skull until the skin is visible. Place the tip of the pipette on the skin and squeeze the pipette firmly several times to empty its contents directly onto the skin. Application at the base of the skull will minimise the opportunity for the animal to lick the product. Apply only to undamaged skin. See figure 2.

Bayer Advocate Cat and ferret application image

Figure 2: Administration to the Cat or Ferret

For dogs up to 25kg

With the dog in a standing position, part the coat between the shoulder blades until the skin is visible. Wherever possible apply to undamaged skin. Place the tip of the pipette on the skin and squeeze the pipette firmly several times to empty its contents directly onto the skin. See Figure 3.

advocate4 (1)

Figure 3: Administration to dogs up to 25kg

For dogs of more than 25 kg

For easy application the dog should be standing. The entire contents of the pipette should be applied evenly as 3 or 4 spots along the top of the back, from between the shoulders to the base of the tail. At each spot, part the coat until the skin is visible. Wherever possible apply to undamaged skin. Place the tip of the pipette on the skin and gently squeeze the pipette to expel a portion of its contents directly onto the skin. Do not apply an excessive amount of solution at any one spot, as that could cause some of the product to run down the animal’s side. See Figure 4.

advocate5 (1)

Figure 4: Administration to dogs over 25kg

Use During Pregnancy and Lactation

The safety of the veterinary medicinal product has not been established during pregnancy and lactation. Laboratory studies with either imidacloprid or moxidectin in rats and rabbits have not produced any evidence of teratogenic, foetotoxic or maternotoxic effects. Use only according to the risk-benefit assessment by the responsible veterinarian.

Contra-indications, warnings, etc

Do not use in kittens under 9 weeks of age.

Do not use in puppies under 7 weeks of age.

Treatment of cats or dogs weighing less than 1 kg, and ferrets weighing less than 0.8 kg should be based on a risk-benefit assessment.

Do not use in the case of hypersensitivity to the active substances or to any of the excipients.

There is limited experience on the use of the product in sick and debilitated animals, thus the product should only be used based on a risk-benefit assessment for these animals.

For cats, the corresponding "Advocate spot-on solution for cat" product, which contains 100 mg/ml imidacloprid and 10 mg/ml moxidectin, must be used.

For ferrets: Do not use Advocate for large cats (0.8ml) or Advocate for dogs (any size), only "Advocate for small cats and ferrets" (0.4 ml) must be used. The product’s efficacy has not been tested in ferrets weighing over 2 kg and therefore the duration of effect might be shorter in these animals.

For dogs, the corresponding "Advocate for dog" product, which contains 100 mg/ml imidacloprid and 25 mg/ml moxidectin, must be used.

The product tastes bitter. Salivation may occasionally occur if the animal licks the application site immediately after treatment. This is not a sign of intoxication and disappears within some minutes without treatment. Correct application will minimize licking of the application site.

In case of accidental oral uptake, symptomatic treatment should be administered. There is no known specific antidote. The use of activated charcoal may be beneficial. After accidental oral ingestion (i.e. licking at the site of application) or overdose, neurological signs (most of which are transient) such as ataxia, generalised tremors, ocular signs (dilated pupils, little pupillary reflex, nystagmus), abnormal respiration, salivation and vomiting may be observed in very rare cases.

The use of the product may result in transient pruritus in the animal. On rare occasions greasy fur, erythema and vomiting can occur. These signs disappear without further treatment. The product may, in rare cases cause local hypersensitivity reactions. The product may in very rare cases cause at the application site a sensation resulting in transient behavioural changes such as lethargy, agitation, and inappetence.

Care should be taken that the content of the pipette or the applied dose does not come into contact with the eyes or mouth of the recipient and/or other animals.

Do not allow recently treated animals to groom each other.

When the product is applied in 3 to 4 separate spots in larger dogs, specific care should be taken to prevent the animal licking the application sites. Oral uptake by Collies, Old English Sheepdogs and related breeds or crossbreeds should be prevented.

During treatment with Advocate no other antiparasitic macrocyclic lactone should be administered. This product contains moxidectin (a macrocyclic lactone), therefore special care should be taken with Collies, Old English Sheepdogs and related breeds or crossbreeds, to correctly administer the product as described above. In particular, oral uptake by the recipient and/or other animals in close contact should be prevented.

Ivermectin-sensitive Collie dogs tolerated up to 5 times the recommended dose repeated at monthly intervals without any adverse effects, but the safety of application at weekly intervals has not been investigated in ivermectin-sensitive Collie dogs. When 40% of the unit dose was given orally, severe neurological signs were observed. Oral administration of 10% of the recommended dose produced no adverse effects.

Up to 10 times the recommended dose was tolerated in adult dogs with no evidence of adverse effects or undesirable clinical signs. Five times the recommended minimum dose applied at weekly intervals for 17 weeks was investigated in dogs aged over 6 months and tolerated with no evidence of adverse effects or undesirable clinical signs.

Up to 10 times the recommended dose was tolerated in cats with no evidence of adverse effects or undesirable clinical signs.

The product was administered to kittens and puppies at up to 5 times the recommended dose, every 2 weeks for 6 treatments, and there were no serious safety concerns. Transient mydriasis, salivation, vomiting and transient rapid respiration were observed.

The product was administered to ferrets at 5 times the recommended dose, every 2 weeks for 4 treatments, and there was no evidence of adverse effects or undesirable clinical signs.

It is recommended that cats and ferrets living in, or travelling to areas endemic for heartworm are treated monthly with the product to protect them from heartworm disease. Whilst the accuracy of diagnosis of heartworm infection is limited, it is recommended that attempts be made to check the heartworm status of any cat and ferret aged over 6 months, before beginning prophylactic treatment, as use of the product on cats or ferrets which have adult heartworms may cause serious adverse effects, including death. If adult heartworm infection is diagnosed, the infection should be treated in accordance with current scientific knowledge.

Although the product may be safely administered to dogs infected with adult heartworms, it has no therapeutic effect against adult Dirofilaria immitis. It is therefore recommended that all dogs 6 months of age or more, living in areas endemic for heartworm, should be tested for existing adult heartworm infection before being treated with the product.

Dogs infected with adult heartworms tolerated up to 5 times the recommended dose, every 2 weeks for 3 treatments, without any adverse effects.

No interactions between Advocate and routinely used veterinary medicinal products or medical or surgical procedures have been observed.

Brief contact of the animal with water on one or two occasions between monthly treatments is unlikely to significantly reduce the efficacy of the product. However, frequent shampooing or immersion of the animal in water after treatment may reduce the efficacy of the product.

Parasite resistance to any particular class of anthelmintic may develop following frequent, repeated use of an anthelmintic of that class.

The solvent in Advocate may stain or damage certain materials including leather, fabrics, plastics and finished surfaces. Allow the application site to dry before permitting contact with such materials.

User Safety

Avoid contact with skin, eyes or mouth.

Do not eat, drink or smoke during application.

Wash hands thoroughly after use.

In case of accidental spillage onto skin, wash off immediately with soap and water.

After application do not stroke or groom animals until the application site is dry.

People with a known hypersensitivity to benzyl alcohol, imidacloprid or moxidectin should administer the product with caution. In very rare cases the product may cause skin sensitisation or transient skin reactions (for example numbness, irritation or burning/tingling sensation). In very rare cases the product may cause respiratory irritation in sensitive individuals.

If the product accidentally gets into eyes, they should be thoroughly flushed with water.

If skin or eye symptoms persist, or the product is accidentally swallowed, seek medical attention and show the package insert to the physician.

Environmental Safety

Advocate should not be allowed to enter surface waters as it has harmful effects on aquatic organisms: moxidectin is highly toxic to aquatic organisms. Dogs should not be allowed to swim in surface waters for 4 days after treatment.

Any unused product or waste materials derived from such veterinary medicinal products should be disposed of in accordance with local requirements.

Pharmaceutical precautions

Do not store above 30°C.

Shelf-life of the veterinary medicinal product as packaged for sale: 3 years

Legal category

POM-V

Packaging Quantities

White polypropylene unit dose pipette with screw cap.

Product name

Pack

Advocate Spot-on solution for Small Cats and Ferrets

Blister pack containing 3 or 6 unit dose pipettes: 0.4 ml per pipette

Advocate Spot-on solution for Large Cats

Blister pack containing 3 or 6 unit dose pipettes: 0.8 ml per pipette

Advocate Spot-on solution for Small Dogs

Blister pack containing 3 unit dose pipettes: 0.4 ml per pipette

Advocate Spot-on solution for Medium Dogs

Blister pack containing 3 or 6 unit dose pipettes: 1.0 ml per pipette

Advocate Spot-on solution for Large Dogs

Blister pack containing 3 or 6 unit dose pipettes: 2.5 ml per pipette

Advocate Spot-on solution for Extra-Large Dogs

Blister pack containing 3 or 6 unit dose pipettes: 4.0ml per pipette

Further information

Pharmacotherapeutic group: therapeutic antiparasitic agent; ATCvet code: QP54AB52.

Imidacloprid, 1-(6-Chloro-3-pyridylmethyl)-N-nitro-imidazolidin-2-ylideneamine is an ectoparasiticide belonging to the chloronicotinyl group of compounds. Chemically, it is more accurately described as a chloronicotinyl nitroguanidine. Imidacloprid is effective against larval flea stages and adult fleas. Flea larvae in the pet’s surroundings are killed after contact with a pet treated with the product. Imidacloprid has a high affinity for the nicotinergic acetylcholine receptors in the post-synaptic region of the central nervous system (CNS) of the flea. The ensuing inhibition of cholinergic transmission in insects results in paralysis and death. Due to the weak nature of the interaction with mammalian nicotinergic receptors and the postulated poor penetration through the blood-brain barrier in mammals, it has virtually no effect on the mammalian CNS. Imidacloprid has minimal pharmacological activity in mammals.

Moxidectin, 23-(O-methyloxime)-F28249 alpha is a second-generation macrocyclic lactone of the milbemycin family. It is a parasiticide which is active against many internal and external parasites. Moxidectin is active against larval stages (L3, L4) of Dirofilaria immitis. It is also active against gastrointestinal nematodes. Moxidectin interacts with GABA and glutamate-gated chloride channels. This leads to opening of the chloride channels on the postsynaptic junction, the inflow of chloride ions and induction of an irreversible resting state. The result is flaccid paralysis of affected parasites, followed by their death and/or expulsion.

After topical administration of the product, imidacloprid is rapidly distributed over the animal’s skin within one day of application. It can be found on the body surface throughout the treatment interval. Moxidectin is absorbed through the skin, reaching maximum plasma concentrations approximately 1 to 2 days after treatment in cats and approximately 4 to 9 days after treatment in dogs. Following absorption from the skin, moxidectin is distributed systemically and is slowly eliminated from the plasma as manifested by detectable moxidectin concentrations in plasma throughout the treatment interval of one month.

Marketing Authorisation Holder (if different from distributor)

Marketing Authorisation Holder

Bayer Animal Health GmbH, D-51368 Leverkusen, Germany

Distributed by

UK: Bayer plc, Animal Health Division, Bayer House, Strawberry Hill, Newbury, Berkshire, RG14 1JA

Ireland: Bayer Ltd, Animal Health Division, The Atrium, Blackthorn Road, Sandyford Ind Est, Dublin 18

Marketing authorisation number

EU/2/03/039/001 - 012

GTIN (Global Trade Item No)

Advocate Spot-on solution for Small Cats and Ferrets (3 Pack)

04007221016878

Advocate Spot-on solution for Small Cats and Ferrets (6 Pack)

04007221020691

Advocate Spot-on solution for Large Cats (3 Pack)

04007221016885

Advocate Spot-on solution for Large Cats (6 Pack)

04007221020684

Advocate Spot-on solution for Small Dogs (3 Pack)

04007221016892

Advocate Spot-on solution for Medium Dogs (3 Pack)

04007221016908

Advocate Spot-on solution for Medium Dogs (6 Pack)

04007221020677

Advocate Spot-on solution for Large Dogs (3 Pack)

04007221016915

Advocate Spot-on solution for Large Dogs (6 Pack)

04007221020660

Advocate Spot-on solution for Extra-large Dogs (3 Pack)

04007221016922

Advocate Spot-on solution for Extra-large Dogs (6 Pack)

04007221020653

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Reviews of Advocate Spot-on Solution for Dogs & Cats

Read our customers' reviews of Advocate Spot-on Solution for Dogs & Cats

Questions & Answers for Advocate Spot-on Solution for Dogs & Cats

Below are some recent questions we've received regarding Advocate Spot-on Solution for Dogs & Cats, including answers from our team.

Ask Your Own Question

My dog is itchy

14th Nov 2014
My dog is itchy

Hi - I have a west highland terrier called maggie who is 8 . Westies are known to have bad skin conditions but her skin has been fabulous up to now - I feed her on the hypoallergenic good . In July this year she got fleas for the first time despite the fact I was using Front Line spot on off the vet. The Vet informed me it wasn't working and prescribed me a Advocate and a spray from my house called Aclaim , which I have used. Maggie still has fleas and is constantly licking her paws so much so they look like pigs trotters , they are pink and swollen . I don't think she has many fleas but I find one or two on her on her every few days or so . How long does it take to erraticate the fleas? If I have missed anywhere in my house with the flea spray and the fleas walk on a part that I have sprayed , will they die ? I know the fleas die after they have bitten her but in the meantime she is just getting bitten everywhere . Any advice would be appreciated esp with regard to her constantly biting and licking her paws

John Cousins
  • Veterinary Surgeon at VioVet

Once fleas become established they can take a while to completely eradicate. Spraying around the house and using a good spot-on is usually effective, but not instantly. Depending on the size of your house you might need to use more than one can of Acclaim; if the concentration of the active ingredients in the surfaces you spray is too low, the effect will be reduced and fleas will take longer to be killed. If you miss areas then the fleas should die if they travel across the treated bits, but obviously they might jump on your dog first. Advocate is very good, but so is Frontline. No spot-on will work instantly. If you were using Frontline from the start then I think there might be a problem with the way you apply it or the frequency. Resistance to Frontline is a convenient excuse which many vets offer in situations like this, but there is no proof that it really occurs. I think the truth is that it is just about potent enough to work if you do everything correctly, but it does not take much to tip the balance in the favour of fleas and there are in fact lots of fleas around this year.

Having said all that, fleas do not typically cause itching of the paws. It is very likely that your dog has other allergies plus perhaps a bacterial or fungal overgrowth affecting the skin here. Due to the phenomenon of the "allergic threshhold", once the flea problem has been controlled, the symptoms might well all disappear, but there will probably be more to it than just fleas. I would look at the diet again and ensure that you are very strict with adherence to the diet (no morsels of anything else at all). Is the diet you use truly hypoallergenic, or just marketed that way? If it contains a mix of proteins from animal and vegetable origin, it is not truly hypoallergenic in a strict sense, though historically these diets were an improvement on the older diets for many dogs.

If your vet is happy that no infection is involved, you are careful about the diet and you continue with diligent flea control, you will get there. Be sure that you apply the spot-on well (whatever you use) and be sure to use enough Acclaim. You could buy another can and treat the difficult areas again if needs be. The only other thing would be if you have started to use cleaning products on the floors which she might be sensitive to. This can be a problem occasionally. Consider this too if it applies.

Which is the best wormer to include lungworm control?

16th Dec 2013
Jenny Hill

I am in an area where lungworm is higher risk, so what treatment can I use for it?

John Cousins
  • Veterinary Surgeon at VioVet

We think that the best worm treatment is using Advocate (monthly) along with Droncit (every 3 months).

Advocate is prescription-only, so you need to talk to your vet about it. Probably it is the best one for lungworm at the moment, but it does not do tapeworms at all. However, Droncit does only tapeworms so between the two, you get everything. Advocate kills fleas and mites as well, giving you almost complete parasite control.

Standard multi-worm tablets are not much good, if at all, at preventing lungworm. They are good for other worms though, including tapeworm. Drontal would be the standard example and is non-prescription.

Cat pulling hair out after using Advocate

16th Dec 2013
Hilary Renolds

I am really concerned about my cats behaviour since I gave him his last dose
of Advocate which I purchased from you early this month.
I gave him his monthly dose as usual last Monday and on Wednesday I noticed
him pulling at the fur on his side when he was grooming to the point where
he was actually pulling tufts of fur out. This has got progressively worse
and I took him to my vet on Saturday, who was not really interested in the
Advocate as they didn't prescribe it!
My Vet recommended Feliway and Zylkene which I have been using since
Saturday but today he has pulled even more fur out and started on his other
side!
He is happy enough in himself still eating, drinking, purring wanting
cuddles and playing with his toy there have been no changes at home and he
is not showing any signs of being stressed. Likewise there are no visible
sings on his skin of any irritation, redness, inflammation, fleas
infestation or anything else I can think of and he has shown no signs of
anything like this in the past.

John Cousins
  • Veterinary Surgeon at VioVet

irstly I would say that it is possible that your cat has reacted to the Advocate, but not at all certain. Probably it would be sensible to report your suspicion to the authorities by the correct method. The following link is to the VMD who are the government body who regulate and monitor the safety of veterinary medicines. They can then assess if this happens more than once and if it should be looked into further. See http://www.vmd.defra.gov.uk/adversereactionreporting/

Secondly your vet should of course provide suitable advice and treatment wherever you buy medication from. Our Advocate comes from the same manufacturer and UK wholesalers that your vet uses as it happens, but even if it were different, your cat still needs appropriate treatment

I would also say that it is not at all unusual for cats to start to do behave as yours is. There are thought to be a lot of potential triggers for this. Some of them are simple "itchy" things like fleas or other parasites, others are more tricky to understand. Adverse drug reactions can cause a general feeling of itchiness, so the Advocate may have caused this. Many other things seem to do so too, and the fact that it took 2 days or so to happen might make it less likely to be the Advocate. Allergies to foods or air-borne dusts and pollens cause a similar reaction. Bizarrely cats seem to spontaneously chew at themselves sometimes. It can be a bit like people biting their nails - there is no sensible reason to do it, but affected cats get into the habit and can go on to make quite a mess of themselves. That is probably why your vet has given you Zylkene and Feliway. They are intended to try and deal with whatever psychological component might be involved. Often there is nothing physically wrong with cats which behave like this, but it seems to be a daft habit. The extent to which they genuinely feel itchy probably varies, but as a problem it is much less common in cats which owners describe as relaxed, calm and laid-back. It is more common in cats which are described as highly-strung, nervous or temperamental. This could be because the problem originates more in the mind than the body, or it could be that a degree of itchiness is ignored by some cats and reacted to by others. It is difficult to say.

My advice would be to avoid ANY spot-on medications for a while, use Feliway and Zylkene, try to keep your cat relaxed and at ease, and see how things go. It might all settle down soon, or it might become a bit of a habit. You might want to give an oil supplement such as Yumega to keep the skin in good condition. Does your cat get hassled by any other cats, either in your house or nearby? Other cats are often the most stressful thing to cats, and pulling hair out can sometimes be a response to that. If this might be the case, see if you can do anything to help.

Advocate or Effipro plus Endoguard?

16th Dec 2013
Jessica Clinton

I am looking to possibly change from an all in one dog Effipro Spot On and Endoguard worm tablet so i wonder if you could offer some pre order advice please? Are prescription treatments considered more effective than non
prescription items? It seems that Advocate covers almost every disease/plague/infestation known to dog (apart from tapeworm) but as a customer i'm not even sure
if what it covers applies to us or if we needed to supplement Advocate with, say, Drontal. Is it like us getting a full course of Foreign/Tropical travel
vaccinations for a visit to skegness :) Would a combination of Effipro and Endoguard "cover our bases"? Do we need a carpet spray too, as i understand some treatments don't actually break the flea life cycle.

John Cousins
  • Veterinary Surgeon at VioVet

This is not a simple question, but I will do my best!

The range of parasites treated by Advocate are broadly similar to those treated by Effipro plus Endoguard, or a similar combination. However Advocate will provide some protection against mites, lungworm and heartworm, none of which are treated by Effipro/Endoguard. Very few dogs in the UK have any trouble with these additional parasites, so the odds are it will make no difference. However for a few dogs it can be a big deal, as the more "exotic" worms are becoming more common in the UK, and occasionally dogs have died from picking them up. (Some people die in car accidents, but that does not stop us getting into a car. How you assess these things depends on your general outlook and philosophy perhaps.)

Conversely Advocate is not active against ticks, which are treated by Effipro and the similar flea treatments. Tapeworms in dogs are only treated by worm tablets. Tapeworms are not regarded as disease-causing, and they can be treated specifically if you see them (they wriggle out of the bottom and move around on the hair nearby, so you will see them if they are there!) Ticks are common in some areas, less so in others. In some parts of the country ticks transmit serious diseases, though not many dogs suffer that way in this country. Ticks themselves are unsightly and occasionally painful, but not usually too bad in themselves. The problems they transmit however can sometimes take a while to show and then be difficult to diagnose, so might be missed by the vet.

On balance I would say that you should try to find out if ticks are common where you live (worst perhaps in New Forest, West Country and Wales) or if Lungworm cases have been reported in your area. This information might sway the argument. If not, then I would say that the two strategies are of approximately equal merit, in which case you might go for the cheapest. It would be possible to argue a case for using all 3 products in combination, applying the spot-ons at 2 week intervals. That would give the absolute best control, but very few people bother to do that!

I do not think that the prescription/non-prescription issue is a guide to how effective they are. All of the products you mention have a very high percentage control effect, but nothing is 100% every time. A few parasites may survive whatever you use.

Finally, using an environmental flea spray is very helpful if fleas tend to be difficult to control, but for most households with just one pet, they are not needed in most years. (This year has been worse than many due to the wet summer we think, so not every year is the same when it comes to flea control.)

Personally on balance I would go for Advocate if I thought that ticks were not a problem. If ticks are seen in your area, especially if you are in one of the areas I mentioned above, then I would definitely use something to control them.

Prescription

3rd Nov 2013
Antonella Caruso
  • VioVet Customer Since: October 2013
  • From: Hertfordshire, United Kingdom

Why do you require a perscriprion?

  • Technical Director at VioVet

The need for a prescription for Advocate is a legal requirement. It is legally classified as POM-V which means prescription only medicine - veterinary. Not all products require a prescription. Often new drugs like this require a prescription from your vet when they are first launched and after being on the market for a long time and proving they're safe they get reclassified. This is what happened with Frontline Spot On. It is my prediction that Advocate will be reclassified as non-prescription at some point but for the time being it does need a prescription I'm afraid.

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