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Frontline Spot On Pipettes for Dogs & Cats

Frontline Spot On Pipettes for Dogs & Cats

Frontline Spot On is the clear market leader for flea and tick treatment for dogs and cats. Easy to use, safe and effective, its introduction revolutionised flea treatment around the world. Many copy type products have appeared, but Frontline Spot-On for dogs and cats remains well ahead of its rivals.

It is supplied in packets of 3 or 6 single use pipettes. The contents of one pipette are applied to the skin at the back of the neck once a month to provide valuable and lasting cover against fleas and ticks, as well as the other health problems they can sometimes cause.

In addition to this flea treatment you may require an additional household spray to combat fleas which may not have yet hatched or dormant fleas in and around the house. Please click here to see the range of household sprays available.

Please take care not to let the product come into contact with varnished or other household surfaces. The alcohol carrier in the product may have adverse effects on these surfaces. Allow the products to fully dry before allowing the animal contact with these surfaces and do not put used pipettes on them.

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Description

Frontline Spot On Flea Treatment

The introduction of Frontline revolutionised the treatment of fleas and ticks on dogs and cats in this country and much of the world. It was originally only available as a spray. When a spot-on formulation came out, this just about swept away every other flea treatment on the market at that time. Since then many 'copy' type products have come onto the market. Some are inferior, some contain the exact same ingredient and can be presumed to be similar both in terms of safety and efficacy. Frontline is also available as a spray. In some circumstances this can be the best form of treatment, but it is more difficult to apply and is not available without prescription.

How does it work?

Frontline Spot-on is supplied in small plastic pipettes. A pipette is opened and the contents are tipped onto the dog or cat's skin at the top of the neck. From here the active ingredient (fipronil) spreads over the surface of the skin and binds to the surface of the skin and hair. Almost none of the drug is absorbed into the body, making it very safe to use. Within about 24 hours it will have spread over the entire body surface, killing fleas wherever they are. Because it binds to the surface it is alright to shampoo an animal, or for it to go swimming, and Frontline will still work. However this should not happen within the first 2 days, and then not more often than once per week, or the duration of effect might be reduced. Normally Frontline lasts for about a month on cats, and two months on dogs. After this length of time much of the treated skin/hair will have been shed and another dose has to be applied.

How effective is it?

Fleas which come into contact with Frontline will die after about 24 hours. This appears to be a reliable and consistent fact. Any fleas living on an animal will be dead within two days of Frontline being applied. However it is important to know that fleas spend much of their life not on the animal at all. This means that treating your cat or dog will not get rid of all the fleas. Many will be living in the pet's bedding, in carpets, or in any nooks and crannies they can find. Female fleas lay eggs as they wander through the fur. These eggs drop to the ground where they hatch and develop. This can happen very quickly in warm, muggy weather. But if it is cold (or very dry), they can remain dormant for a long time, becoming active when it warms up. These new fleas will jump onto your pets (or sometimes even you) when they develop. This is why people often discover a flea problem when they switch the central heating on in late autumn. Dormant fleas (in the form of pupae) are stimulated into activity by the warmth. Therefore if you are aware of fleas on your pets, you can be pretty sure that you are seeing a small fraction of the total population. (It is often claimed that there will be up to 100 fleas living in the environment of our pets, for every one found on a pet!) Therefore if fleas are being seen, it is very important to treat the whole house with an insecticide, to vacuum carpets frequently, and to wash any bedding if possible. If you are not seeing fleas, and are using Frontline as a precaution, then this is less important. The environmental infestation will not occur if your pets are treated with Frontline all the time. But if you let the fleas get a 'head start', then just treating the pets will be a slow way of getting rid of the entire flea population. As soon as you see fleas, it normally means there are lots, and you need to treat the house as well as the pets to get rid of them. If there is a very heavy flea burden in the environment before you start treating your pets, it can take quite a while to get rid of them all, even with a product as effective as Frontline. This does not mean there is any resistance developing, which seems not to be the case. It is just a feature of flea populations. It is always best to treat as a preventative, rather than waiting for a real problem to develop.

Does Frontline have any side effects?

Frontline is extremely safe when used on cats and dogs in the recommended way. Very little of the drug is absorbed into the body at all. Occasionally there will be a localised skin reaction at the site of application. This is more commonly seen on cats and is usually a small patch of inflamed skin with some hair loss. It normally clears up without treatment after a few weeks, but if this does occur, it might be best to avoid using Frontline Spot-on in future. There is some evidence that Frontline can be dangerous to rabbits, so avoid using Frontline on them.

The difference between Frontline Spot On & Frontline Combo?

  • Frontline Spot On
    • This contains one ingredient.
    • It coats the skin and hair after being applied and kills off fleas.
    • It persists on the coat even if the animal swims or is shampooed, as long as there is at least a 24 hour gap before and after applying the Frontline.
  • Frontline Combo (Prescription required)
    • This contains 2 ingredients.
    • The first one is exactly the same as in normal Spot-on.
    • The second one also coats the skin and coat, but does not kill fleas at all. Instead it sterilises fleas, so that they cannot breed.
    • The idea of it is that it persists longer on the coat than the killing ingredient.
    • Hence if people do not re-apply the frontline as often as they should, then the killing ingredient will no longer be effective (especially on animals at the top of the weight range of the product used). The other ingredient works for about twice as long as the main ingredient. The idea behind this is that if fleas cannot breed, you only get very small numbers of them and they are unlikely to be noticed or do any harm.

Frontline Spot On Cat 10% w/v Spot On Solution

Presentation

Spot-on solution containing 10% w/v fipronil. Each pipette contains 0.5 ml (50 mg fipronil). Also contains butylhydroxyanisole (E320) and butylhydroxytoluene (E321).

Uses

The treatment and prevention of infestations by fleas (Ctenocephalides spp.), ticks (Rhipicephalus spp., Dermacentor spp. and Ixodes spp.) in cats, and as part of a treatment strategy for Flea Allergy Dermatitis, where this has been previously diagnosed by a veterinary surgeon. The product controls infestations with Felicola subrostratus biting lice on cats. FRONTLINE Spot-On Cat can be used in kittens from 8 weeks of age and weighing at least 1kg.

Dosage and administration

Route of administration

By topical application to the skin.

Dosage

1 pipette of 0.5 ml per cat (approximately 7.5 - 15 mg/kg).

Method of administration

Hold upright. Tap the narrow part of the pipette to ensure that the contents are within the main body of the pipette. Break back the snap-off top of the spot-on pipette along the scored line. Part the coat between the shoulder blades until the skin is visible. Place the tip of the pipette on the skin and squeeze gently to empty its contents onto the skin, preferably at two spots, one at the base of the skull and a second 2-3 cms further back.

Care should be taken to avoid excessive wetting of the hair with the product since this will cause a sticky appearance of hairs at the treatment spot. However, should this occur, it will disappear within 24 hours post application.

In the absence of safety studies, the minimum treatment interval is 4 weeks.

It is important to apply the dose to an area where the animal cannot lick off and to make sure that animals do not lick each other after treatment. If licking does occur, a brief period of hypersalivation may be observed, due mainly to the nature of the carrier. Ensure that treated animals do not groom each other after treatment until dry.

Contra-indications, warnings, etc

For animal treatment only.

For external use only.

Animals should be weighed accurately prior to treatment.

Do not use in rabbits, as adverse reactions and even death could occur.

Flammable.

Animals or operators with a known hypersensitivity to insecticides or alcohol should avoid contact with FRONTLINE Spot-On Cat.

In the absence of available data, the product should not be used on kittens less than 8 weeks old and/or weighing less than 1kg.

Do not use on sick (systemic diseases, fever...) or convalescent animals.

Among the extremely rare suspected adverse reactions, transient cutaneous reactions at the application site (scaling, local alopecia, pruritis, erythema) and general pruritis or alopecia have been reported after use.

Exceptionally, hypersalivation, reversible neurological signs (hyperaesthesia, depression, nervous signs) or vomiting have been observed after use.

Do not overdose.

Avoid contact with the animals eyes.

Fipronil may adversely affect aquatic organisms. Do not contaminate ponds, waterways or ditches with the product or empty containers. Any unused veterinary medicinal product or waste materials derived from such veterinary medicinal products should be disposed of in accordance with local requirements.

Operator Warnings

The product can cause mucous membrane and eye irritation and so contact with the mouth and eyes should be avoided.

Avoid contents coming into contact with the fingers. If this occurs, wash hands with soap and water. After accidental ocular exposure the eye should be rinsed carefully with plain water.

Wash hands after use.

Do not smoke, eat or drink during application.

Treated animals should not be handled until the application site is dry, and children should not be allowed to play with treated animals until the application site is dry. It is therefore recommended that animals are not treated during the day, but should be treated during the early evening, and that recently treated animals should not be allowed to sleep with owners, especially children.

Pharmaceutical precautions

Store in the original package.

Store in a dry place.

Do not store above 30oC.

Keep out of the reach and sight of children.

Flammable.

Legal category

NFA-VPS

Packaging Quantities

Blister packs containing 3 or 6 pipettes of 0.5 ml.

Further information

Fipronil is a member of the phenylpyrazole family of non-systemic insecticides/acaricides, which acts by blocking the GABA receptor to kill the target parasite on contact.

FRONTLINE Spot-On Cat is effective against fleas for up to 5 weeks in cats and prevents re-infestation with all stages of Rhipicephalus spp., Dermacentor spp., and Ixodes spp. ticks for up to one month, depending on the level of environmental challenge. Newly arriving fleas are killed within 24 hours of landing on the animal. Re-treatment may safely be carried out at one month intervals.

FRONTLINE Spot-On Cat is licensed for use as part of a strategy for the treatment of Flea Allergy Dermatitis. For this condition, monthly application to the allergic patient and to other cats in the household is recommended.

FRONTLINE Spot-On Cat does not prevent ticks attaching to the animal, but ticks will be killed in the first 24-48 hours after attachment. Once dead, ticks will often drop off the animal, but any remaining ticks may easily be removed by a gently pull, preferably using tweezers. There may be an attachment of single ticks. For this reason transmission of infectious diseases cannot be completed excluded if conditions are unfavourable.

For optimum control of flea problems in a multi-pet household, all dogs and cats in the household should be treated with a suitable insecticide. Fleas from pets often infest the animal's basket, bedding and regular resting areas such as carpets and soft furnishings which should be treated, in case of massive infestation and at the beginning of the control measures, with a suitable insecticide and vacuumed regularly.

When treating infestations of lice, all in-contact cats should be treated with an appropriate product at the same time.

Laboratory studies using fipronil have not shown any teratogenic or embryotoxic effect.

The safety of the product was demonstrated in breeding, pregnant and lactating queens treated with multiple consecutive doses with up to 3 times the maximum recommended dose. FRONTLINE Spot-On Cat can be used in breeding, pregnant and lactating queens.

No adverse effects have been seen in cats and kittens aged 8 weeks or older and weighing about 1kg treated monthly with five times the recommended dose for six consecutive months. However, the risk of adverse effects may increase with overdosing. Itching may occur following treatment.

After the topical application of FRONTLINE Spot-On Cat, the products will spread from the site of treatment to cover the entire surface of the animal within 24 hours. After application, absorption of fipronil through the skin is negligible.

No known incompatibilities exist for the use of other insecticides or flea control products concurrently with FRONTLINE Spot-On Cat.

There are no data available on the effect of bathing and shampooing on the efficacy of FRONTLINE Spot-On Cat in cats. However, based on information available for dogs shampooed from 2 days after application of the product, it is not recommended to bath animals within 2 days after application of FRONTLINE Spot-On Cat.

The alcohol carrier may have adverse effects on painted, varnished or other household surfaces or furnishings.

Marketing authorisation number

Vm 08327/4133.

Frontline Spot On Dog 10% w/v Spot On Solution

Presentation

Spot-on solution containing 10% w/v fipronil. Presented in plastic pipettes, each containing 0.67 ml (67 mg fipronil), 1.34 ml (134 mg fipronil), 2.68 ml (268 mg fipronil) or 4.02ml (402 mg fipronil). Also contains butylhydroxyanisole (E320) and butylhydroxytoluene (E321).

Uses

The treatment and prevention of infestations by fleas (Ctenocephalides spp.) and ticks (Rhipicephalus spp., Dermacentor spp. and Ixodes spp.) and as part of a treatment strategy for Flea Allergy Dermatitis where this has been previously diagnosed by a veterinary surgeon. The product controls infestations with Trichodectes canis biting lice on dogs. FRONTLINE Spot-On Dog can be used in puppies from 8 weeks of age and weighing over 2kg.

Dosage and administration

Route of administration

By topical application to the skin.

Dosage

1 pipette of 0.67 ml per dog weighing over 2 kg and up to 10 kg bodyweight (approximately 7.5 - 15 mg/kg).

1 pipette of 1.34 ml per dog weighing over 10 kg and up to 20 kg bodyweight (approximately 7.5 - 15 mg/kg).

1 pipette of 2.68 ml per dog weighing over 20 kg and up to 40 kg bodyweight (approximately 7.5 - 15 mg/kg).

1 pipette of 4.02 ml per dog weighing over 40 kg and up to 60 kg bodyweight (approximately 7.5 – 15 mg/kg).

For dogs over 60 kg bodyweight, use two pipettes of 2.68 ml.

Method of administration

Hold upright. Tap the narrow part of the pipette to ensure the contents are within the main body of the pipette. Break back the snap-off top of the spot-on pipette along the scored line. Part the coat between the shoulder blades until the skin is visible. Place the tip of the pipette on the skin and squeeze gently at one or two spots to empty its contents onto the skin.

Care should be taken to avoid excessive wetting of the hair with the product since this will cause a sticky appearance of hairs at the treatment spot. However, should this occur, it will disappear within 24 hours post application.

In the absence of safety studies, the minimum treatment interval is 4 weeks.

Contra-indications, warnings, etc

For animal treatment only.

For external use only.

Animals should be weighed accurately prior to treatment.

Do not use in rabbits, as adverse reactions and even death could occur.

Flammable.

Animals or operators with a known hypersensitivity to insecticides or alcohol should avoid contact with FRONTLINE Spot-On Dog.

In the absence of available data, the product should not be used on puppies less than 8 weeks old and/or weighing less than 2kg.

Do not use on sick (systemic diseases, fever....) or convalescent animals.

This product is specifically developed for dogs. Do not use in cats as this could lead to overdosing.

Do not overdose.

It is important to apply the dose to an area where the animal cannot lick it off, and to make sure that animals do not lick each other following treatment. If licking occurs, a brief period of hypersalivation may occur, due mainly to the nature of the carrier.

Among the extremely rare suspected adverse reactions, transient cutaneous reactions at the application site (skin discolouration, local alopecia, pruritis, erythema) and general pruritis or alopecia have been reported after use. Exceptionally, hypersalivation, reversible neurological signs (hyperaesthesia, depression, nervous signs) or vomiting or respiratory signs have been observed after use.

Dogs should not be allowed to swim in watercourses for 2 days after application.

Operator warnings

The product can cause mucous membrane and eye irritation and so contact with the mouth and eyes should be avoided.

Avoid contents coming into contact with the fingers. If this occurs, wash hands with soap and water.

After accidental ocular exposure the eye should be rinsed carefully with plain water.

Avoid contact with the animal's eyes.

Wash hands after use.

Do not smoke, eat or drink during application .

Treated animals should not be handled until the application site is dry, and children should not be allowed to play with treated animals until the application site is dry. It is therefore recommended that animals are not treated during the day, but should be treated during the early evening, and that recently treated animals should not be allowed to sleep with owners, especially children.

Ensure that treated animals do not groom each other after treatment until dry.

Fipronil may adversely affect aquatic organisms. Do not contaminate ponds, waterways or ditches with the product or empty containers. Any unused veterinary medicinal product or waste materials derived from such veterinary medicinal products should be disposed of in accordance with local requirements.

Pharmaceutical precautions

Store in the original package.

Store in a dry place.

Do not store above 30oC.

Keep out of the reach and sight of children.

Flammable.

Legal category

NFA-VPS

Packaging Quantities

Blister packs containing 3 or 6 pipettes of either 0.67 ml, 1.34 ml, 2.68 ml or 4.02 ml.

Further information

Fipronil is a member of the phenylpyrazole family of non-systemic insecticides/acaricides, which acts by blocking the GABA receptor to kill the target parasite on contact.

FRONTLINE Spot-On Dog is effective against flea infestation for approximately two months and against tick infestation for up to one month, depending on the level of environmental challenge. Newly arriving fleas are killed within 24 hours of landing on the animal. Re-treatment may safely be carried out at one month intervals.

FRONTLINE Spot-On Dog is licensed for use as part of a strategy for the treatment of Flea Allergy Dermatitis. For this condition, monthly application to the allergic patient and to other dogs in the household is recommended.

FRONTLINE Spot-On Dog does not prevent all ticks attaching to the animal, but ticks will be killed in the first 24 - 48 hours after attachment, prior to full engorgement and therefore minimising the risk of transmission of disease. Once dead, ticks will often drop off the animal, but any remaining ticks may easily be removed by a gentle pull, preferably using tweezers. There may be an attachment of single ticks. For this reason transmission of infectious diseases cannot be completely excluded if conditions are unfavourable.

Fleas from pets often infest the animal's basket, bedding and regular resting areas such as carpets and soft furnishings which should be treated, in case of massive infestation and at the beginning of the control measures, with a suitable insecticide and vacuumed regularly.

When treating infestations of lice, all in-contact dogs should be treated with an appropriate product at the same time.

Laboratory studies using fipronil have not shown any teratogenic or embryotoxic effect. The safety of the product was demonstrated in breeding, pregnant and lactating bitches treated with multiple consecutive doses with up to 3 times the maximum recommended dose. FRONTLINE Spot-On Dog can be used in breeding, pregnant and lactating bitches.

No adverse effects were seen in 8-week old puppies, growing dogs and dogs weighing about 2 kg treated once at five times the recommended dose. The risk of adverse effects may increase when overdosing, so animals should always be treated with the correct pipette size according to bodyweight. Safety data are not available for use of the product in animals less than 8 weeks of age.

After the topical application of FRONTLINE Spot-On Dog, the product will spread from the site of treatment to cover the entire surface of the animal within 24 hours. After application, absorption of fipronil through the skin is slight.

No known incompatibilities exist for the use of other insecticides or flea control products concurrently with FRONTLINE Spot-On Dog.

Bathing or shampooing the animal up to one hour prior to treatment does not affect the efficacy of the product. Bathing/immersion in water within 2 days after application of the product and more frequent bathing than once a week should be avoided, as no study has been performed to investigate how this affects the efficacy of the product. Emollient shampoos can be used prior to treatment, but reduce the duration of protection against fleas to approximately 5 weeks when used weekly after application of the product. Weekly bathing with a 2% chlorhexidine medicated shampoo did not affect efficacy against fleas during a 6 week long study.

The alcohol carrier may have adverse effects on painted, varnished or other household surfaces or furnishings.

Marketing authorisation number

Vm 08327/4132.

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Reviews of Frontline Spot On Pipettes for Dogs & Cats

Read our customers' reviews of Frontline Spot On Pipettes for Dogs & Cats

Questions & Answers for Frontline Spot On Pipettes for Dogs & Cats

Below are some recent questions we've received regarding Frontline Spot On Pipettes for Dogs & Cats, including answers from our team.

Ask Your Own Question

Eliminall fiprinol

26th Nov 2014
Dawn Wood

My mum and Dad had a fit and other that skin allergies healthy 3 year old cross Staffordshire bull terrier, they use the Pdsa for any treatments she need she was on prednisolone 1 every other day for her allergies, for her worming the Pdsa sold them drontol and for her flee treatment they sold them stronghold because they said it is better for her allergies, on the 21st of November my Dad went to the pharmacy at the Pdsa for her regular flea treatment and they sold him eliminall fiprinol my dad mentioned to her that she usually get stronghold and her reply was its fine it's all the same stuff just a different name so my dad went home and applied it between her shoulder blades and within a few seconds the dog started running around like a lunatic rubbing it on the furniture when my dad looked she had a large red Mark where he had put it,from then on she started being quiet then on Saturday she ate her dinner but after that she just slept she then ate her tea at about 6pm then was sick at 7pm on Sunday all through the day she was sick about 10 time all was yellow liquid, she never ate or drank anything just slept, he rang the vets on Monday opening times they told him to bring her straight in he told them about the flea treatment and she told him it can't be that then said we'll put her on a drip come collect her at 3.30pm so they did, on collection the vet said if she's still the same tomorrow bring her back at 8.40am so they took her back the vet gave her an antihistamine injection and pain killer injection my dad mentioned the flea treatment again as it was a different vet but she said we don't really know love but take her home and bring her in tomorrow if she's still the same and we'll have to do an xray so they took her home and she just laid on the sofa asleep then at about 4.30pm she took a few heavy breathes and died,they rushed to the vets and they said yes we are sorry but she has died they left her there to be picked up for cremation, they are absolutely devastated as you would be she was only 3 so my mum knew some one that knows a few vets as she was my mum's dog trainer, she told her what has happened and the trainer said she'll ring around to see what they think, so she rang around a few vets and each of them said she shouldn't have been given that flea treatment because of her allergies and to get an autopsy done to see how she died but my mum doesn't want it doing as she doesn't want her cut up, do you think it was the flea treatment that killed her and if it was is there anything we can do so it doesn't happen again to any other animal it should really be taken off the shelves if it's that dangerous to dogs with allergies
Thanks Dawn wood

John Cousins
  • Veterinary Surgeon at VioVet

I am very sorry to hear about your parent's dog. It all sounds very distressing.

Fipronil is the active ingredient of many flea treatments now. It is completely different from the active ingredient in Stronghold (=selamectin). Fipronil is actually one of the safest treatments and is probably the most widely used flea treatment in the world. It is not rare to get a mild reaction when fipronil products are applied. This often involves apparent discomfort at the application site, and a sore area of skin. It is extremely rare to get any sort of further reaction. The side effects are purely related to a localised skin reaction and the dog remains in perfect health otherwise.

This dog has either had a much more profound and serious reaction, or it has had a mild skin reaction but then also suffered a different, unrelated, catastrophic event of a different cause. The only way to know would be to conduct a full post mortem examination. I suspect that the flea treatment might not be the cause despite the timing of the application because so many millions of doses are given safely. Statistically some dogs do suffer serious and sudden illness and die. If something was done to them just before hand, the obvious thing to do is to blame that thing. Where these cases are investigated, there is often a different underlying problem, though serious reactions to fipronil will occur. The only thing we know for certain is that for most dogs, fipronil is a great treatment. (We know that hundreds of people die in road traffic accidents, but we do not ban cars. Some level of risk in life has to be accepted.) If you want to know for certain, this case should be investigated. Ideally you should report this suspected adverse reaction to the VMD. This can be done online or by post. The PDSA will be able to help with this and it might be that the manufacturer of the product used would pay for the examination to be done. You should speak to the PDSA about this. We only learn more about adverse reactions if they are properly investigated.

Can i use frontline on my newborn kittens.

29th Aug 2014
karen

my cat gave birth 3 days ago and she is due to have her flea treatment done again next week , i have noticed she is scratching and i don't wont the kittens to pick up her fleas , what can i safely use on all of them.

John Cousins
  • Veterinary Surgeon at VioVet

It is perfectly safe to apply this to your cat with kittens. Do not apply anything to the kittens directly - the fleas will be killed through treating their mother.

How long does one pipette last?

20th Aug 2014
Ruth Davis
  • VioVet Customer Since: January 2014
  • From: west yorkshire, United Kingdom

How long does one pipette last on a cat.

  • Product Management Team at VioVet

Frontline Spot On for cats kills fleas for up to 5 weeks and ticks for up to 4 weeks. The minimum treatment interval is four weeks.

Safe for puppies?

12th Jul 2014
Angela barker

I have a 11 week old Jack Russell pup are the spot on treatments safe for her?

  • Product Management Team at VioVet

The spot on treatment is suitable for puppies once they reach 8 weeks old but should not be used if the puppy weighs less than 2kg.

Safe for pregant cat?

19th Feb 2014
sharon

Can frontline be used on pregnant cat?

Danielle Fletcher
  • AMTRA Qualified Product Advisor at VioVet

Yes, Frontline Spot On Cat can be safely used in breeding, pregnant and lactating queens. The product is regarded as being extremely safe.

Applying Frontline

16th Dec 2013
Cara Barrett

Where do I apply Frontline?

John Cousins
  • Veterinary Surgeon at VioVet

In fact it should be fine to put the Frontline anywhere on the body, as long as it gets onto the skin without running off, or being removed by the dog. However I am not sure this will make the difference for you. I believe in fact that if the Frontline goes mostly onto the hair of the scruff area, it will still work. As long as it does not drip off the dog by running over the surface of the hair and falling to the ground, it should work. The active ingredient diffuses through the oily coating of the skin and hair. This oily stuff (sebum) coats all the hairs, as well as the skin surface, and indeed Frontline passes over the surface of the body partly through hairs rubbing against each other as the dog moves, so transferring the Frontline by moving contact as well as diffusion.

If your dog is itchy, some form of allergy (dietary or inhaled) might well be the reason, unless you are seeing evidence of fleas. I would continue to use Frontline regularly, however you apply it, but be open to other possibilities. If your dog is really bad then you should see a vet, but otherwise you could try one of the oil supplements designed to help with itchy dogs. (Yumega Plus is very popular at the moment for this purpose. I would try that too personally.)

Frontline for dogs not effective

16th Dec 2013
Paulette Thicke

I have two seven year old terriers who are currently plagued by fleas. We've always used Frontline drops and Acclaim environmental spray, which has worked well in the past. This year however, the treatments seem ineffective, as both dogs are scratching, rubbing and chewing out clumps of fur
Can I re-spray the house with acclaim even though it was only sprayed 3 months ago? and can I increase the frequency of the frontline treatment to monthly on a regular basis, or is that risking overdose?

John Cousins
  • Veterinary Surgeon at VioVet

It has been a particularly bad year for fleas and lots of people are having a similar experience. It seems that it is still effective to use Frontline for dogs against fleas, but it is not able to kill every flea which jumps onto a dog before it has had a chance to feed a few times. In most years, when the flea population is not too great, Frontline is perfectly adequate. If the background flea population gets too high, then it takes a while to get under control and the fleas continue to be a nuisance for a while.

It is perfectly safe for you to repeat the Acclaim treatment again. You should keep animals out of the room when spraying. Then leave doors and windows closed and let the spray settle to the floor for an hour or two before going back in. It is also a very good idea to apply the Frontline every 28 days. More frequently than this is not recommended and probably of little extra benefit. Leaving it longer than 28 days is acceptable if fleas are not evident, but will not provide maximum control in the face of an outbreak.

Frontline spot-on or combo?

16th Dec 2013
Samantha Heeney

Which is better, Frontline spot-on or combo?

John Cousins
  • Veterinary Surgeon at VioVet

Frontline Combo is essentially the same as the Spot-on, but Combo has an additional ingredient. This lasts for longer on the coat, so has an effect if there is an extended delay in re-applying the Frontline. The extra ingredient is probably just as safe as the main ingredient, the prescription status might well be a commercial decision by the manufacturer.

The extra ingredient does not kill fleas, but in fact stops them from breeding. Since an individual flea does not live for long, stopping them breeding is an effective way of preventing fleas build up in the environment.

Most people consider that there is little effective difference between the 2 products, but if you try to extend the periods between successive applications, Combo is slightly better. Safety of them both is very high and probably not a significant concern.

Flea treatment on cats and Frontline not working.

16th Dec 2013
Harold Thorpe

My wife has been using Frontline once every 3-4 weeks for months and only did the cats two weeks ago and the fleas are now on the cats again. Before that it only lasted for 3 weeks. It has worked in the past but seems to be not working. We've been treating the house as well with spray and regularly hoover. Is there another flea treatment you could recommend as in the past the above treatments have worked but don't seem to any longer. The fleas target our young daughter and she's covered in bites.

John Cousins
  • Veterinary Surgeon at VioVet

A lot of people have been saying the same thing about Frontline this year. It has been a particularly bad year for fleas anyway, the wet summer suited them perfectly and the background populations built up to a huge level. Even if the Frontline was working well now, it might be that you would soon see fleas again, even if they die off after a day or two and are replaced by other fleas.

I am unsure if Frontline is genuinely becoming less effective than it used to be. This maybe the case, or it might be that there are just so many fleas around this year. We cannot really tell. As a precaution it would be a sensible idea to switch to a different product, at least until the flea population has died down. The product I would recommend is Advantage. It has a completely different active ingredient, but is also a spot-on which you can buy without a vet's prescription. I would have to recommend that you vacuum clean your carpets regularly, and spray around with a household insecticide again if you have not done that for a while. Acclaim would be a good choice for household flea treatment.

Bad reaction to Frontline

16th Dec 2013
Florence Burns

My dog has twice developed "hot spots", and last time this was where I applied Frontline flea treatment. Is there a more natural flea treatment I can use without chemicals?

John Cousins
  • Veterinary Surgeon at VioVet

Some animals appear to react to the alcohol "carrier" used in spot-on medications. If the hot spot was in the same place you applied the Frontline, then you should avoid it in future.

There are a few things you could consider:
Tablets to control fleas are now available which are very effective and safe. The best ones are prescription only (Comfortis) so you could ask your vet about those. They appear to be very effective.
Natural flea treatments are available, but they are not particularly effective. If you are just treating as a precaution, they may be good enough, but flea irritation is also a common trigger for hot spot formation, so I would be wary. Biospotix flea collar or are examples.
Additionally there are things you can use to try and help your dog's skin be less itchy generally. These normally work by supplementing with certain oils which help the skin to produce a more effective barrier to things which make it itchy, and perhaps have a direct anti-itch effect too. Good examples would be Yumega Plus oil to be taken with food, or Allerderm spot-on to be applied to the skin or Denes Hot Itch Lotion

I would go for Comfortis tablets and Yumega Plus, but up to you. Environmental flea control with suitable aerosol treatments such as Indorex would also help a lot.

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